Attorney for Covington Catholic High School student sues Washington Post for $250 million


Covington High student's legal team sues Washington Post

The attorneys for Nick Sandmann, the Covington Catholic student who was at the center of a media firestorm a few weeks ago with Nathan Phillips at the Lincoln Memorial, has now file a whopper of a lawsuit against the Washington Post, to the tune of $250 million dollars:

FOR TRUTH, FOR JUSTICE, FOR NICHOLAS!

Today, Lin Wood and Todd McMurtry filed their first lawsuit on behalf of Nicholas Sandmann against The Washington Post. The lawsuit filed is included below. The suit seeks $250 million in both compensatory and punitive damages. Lin and Todd will continue to bring wrongdoers before the court to seek damages in compensation for the harm so many have done to the Sandmann family. This is only the beginning.
Wow! That would buy enough tacos for SooperMexican to last the rest of the year!
Seriously though, I hope he wins and wins big. The media need to be held accountable for what they’ve done to him, his family, and the other students.

Update Donald Trump Twitter:


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  1. Attorneys representing the Kentucky high school student involved in a confrontation that went viral on social media last month announced Tuesday that they were suing The Washington Post for $250 million in compensatory and punitive damages.

    The lawsuit, which was filed in federal court in Kentucky, accused The Post of practicing "a modern-day form of McCarthyism" by targeting Nicholas Sandmann and "using its vast financial resources to enter the bully pulpit by publishing a series of false and defamatory print and online articles ... to smear a young boy who was in its view an acceptable casualty in their war against the president."

    Washington Post spokesperson Kris Coratti told Fox News in an email that the paper was "reviewing a copy of the lawsuit, and we plan to mount a vigorous defense."

    Sandmann, a junior at Covington Catholic High School, became a target for outrage after a video of him standing face-to-face with a Native American man, Nathan Phillips, while wearing a red "Make America Great Again" hat surfaced in January. Sandmann was one of a group of students from Covington attending the anti-abortion March for Life in Washington, D.C., while Phillips was attending the Indigenous Peoples' March on the same day.

    Sandmann and the Covington students were initially accused of initiating the confrontation, but other videos and the students' own statements showed that they were verbally accosted by a group of black street preachers who were shouting insults both at them and a group of Native Americans. Sandmann and Phillips have both said they were trying to defuse the situation.

    The lawsuit claims The Post "ignored the truth" about the incident and says the paper "falsely accused Nicholas of ... 'accost[ing]' Phillips by 'suddenly swarm[ing]' him in a 'threaten[ing]' and 'physically intimidat[ing]' manner ... 'block[ing]' Phillips path, refusing to allow Phillips 'to retreat,' 'taunting the dispersing indigenous crowd,' [and] chanting, 'Build that wall,' 'Trump2020,' or 'Go back to Africa,' and otherwise engaging in racist and improper conduct. ..."Sandmann's attorneys accuse The Post of publishing seven "false and defamatory" articles about the incident between Jan. 19 and 21 and claim the paper "knew and intended that its false and defamatory accusations would be republished by others, including media outlets and others on social media."

    Earlier this month, Sandmann's attorneys sent preservation letters to more than 50 media organizations, celebrities and politicians -- including The Post, The New York Times, CNN, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and actors Alyssa Milano and Jim Carrey -- the first step in possible libel and defamation lawsuits.

    Last week, investigators hired by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Covington concluded that the students did not instigate the confrontation with Phillips. Bishop Roger Foys, who initially condemned the students' behavior, wrote in a letter to parents that they had been "placed in a situation that was at once bizarre and even threatening."

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  2. Donald Trump cheers Covington student's lawsuit against Washington Post: "Go get them Nick"

    Donald Trump on Wednesday cheered the news that attorneys representing a high school student involved in a now-infamous confrontation with a Native American activist last month are suing The Washington Post.

    The lawsuit, which was filed in federal court in Kentucky, accused the Post of practicing "a modern-day form of McCarthyism" by targeting Nicholas Sandmann and "using its vast financial resources to enter the bully pulpit by publishing a series of false and defamatory print and online articles ... to smear a young boy who was in its view an acceptable casualty in their war against the president."

    The suit is seeking $250 million in compensatory and punitive damages.

    In an early morning tweet Wednesday, Trump threw his support behind Sandmann, writing: “Covington student suing WAPO. Go get them Nick. Fake News!”

    Sandmann, a junior at Covington Catholic High School, became a target for outrage after a video surfaced in January of him standing face-to-face with a Native American man, Nathan Phillips, while wearing a red "Make America Great Again" hat.

    Sandmann was one of a group of students from Covington attending the anti-abortion March for Life in Washington, D.C., while Phillips was attending the Indigenous Peoples' March on the same day. But while the students were initially portrayed as antagonizing the man, other details soon emerged showing he approached the students, and another group called the Black Hebrew Israelites was instigating with profane comments.

    Earlier this month, Sandmann's attorneys sent preservation letters to more than 50 media organizations, celebrities and politicians -- including The Post, The New York Times, CNN, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and actors Alyssa Milano and Jim Carrey -- the first step in possible libel and defamation lawsuits.

    Last week, investigators hired by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Covington concluded that the students did not instigate the confrontation with Phillips. Bishop Roger Foys, who initially condemned the students' behavior, wrote in a letter to parents that they had been "placed in a situation that was at once bizarre and even threatening."

    Washington Post spokesperson Kris Coratti told Fox News in an email that the paper was "reviewing a copy of the lawsuit, and we plan to mount a vigorous defense."

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  3. Gutfeld on Nick Sandmann’s lawsuit against The Washington Post

    The media made tons off of Covington Catholic High School student Nick Sandmann. Why shouldn't he get a piece of the action?

    Nick Sandmann, the smiling target of the infamous Covington smear, is suing The Washington Post for 250 million bucks for leading the media mob.

    Can’t say I blame him.

    Because the story isn’t about Covington, but those who covered it – not to mention all the money they made off that smear.

    This case – along with Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, actor Jussie Smollett and a hundred others – need to be a journalism course. One that reveals how echo-chamber media gins up outrage, protects narratives and steers social media into a frenzy.

    We blame Twitter – but Twitter’s just the wall the media throws stuff at to see what sticks. If it sticks, you make a lot of money or use it to build the reputations of some left-wing hacks.

    Nick's lawsuit means that in the future, some dope can’t brag to the Pulitzer committee that he broke the Covington story!

    Remember the Supreme Court Senate confirmation hearings for Clarence Thomas, and how that turned many liberals, like Andrew Breitbart, into fire-breathing conservatives? Sometimes a show trial reveals more than you think.

    Sen. Diane Feinstein, D-Calif., traded her reputation for a shot at Kavanaugh.

    Since 2016, those epiphany moments like Covington have piled up. In mere months we've seen three major media fails.

    There are others. But there's only one persistent culprit at the crime scene: the mainstream media.

    Journalists who are writing for other journalists, hoping to get a better job, a book deal, a prize, a minute on TV.

    And the motivating factor behind the machine: conflict.

    Conflict leads to eyeballs, which leads to clicks, which leads to money.

    Yeah, the media made tons off Covington. So why shouldn’t the kid get a piece of the action?

    After all, without poor Nick, some of us would have to work for a living.

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